5 Easy Plastic Free Swaps that Don't Cost A Lot of $

Getting rid of disposable plastic doesn't have to cost a lot of money, or take a lot of time.  Here are five easy (and cheap) ways to ditch disposable plastic.

5 Easy Plastic Free Swaps That Don't Cost a Lot of Money

1. Ditch paper towels

Switching from paper towels to reusable dish cloths in the kitchen is a great way to reduce waste and save money.  Dish cloths clean better and last way longer.  Just throw them in the laundry when they're dirty, and you're good to go.

DIY: Cut up old towels into squares
BUY: Pack of 6 dish cloths - $3.99

2. Clean with vinegar and baking soda

Don't believe the marketing hype-you don't need a different cleaner for every surface of your home.  Vinegar and baking soda work wonders for household cleaning.  I keep a spray bottle of vinegar (half vinegar/half water) that I use to clean pretty much everything in our house.  Baking soda works great for surfaces that need a scrub--the toilet, stovetop, etc.

DIY: The Zero Waste Chef makes her own apple scrap vinegar!
BUY: 2 lb. box of baking soda - $1.29 | 16 oz. glass bottle of vinegar - $1.29

3. Swap out your shampoo and conditioner for a solid shampoo bar

Like cleaning products, we are constantly told how many different personal care products we need.  Ditch the plastic shampoo and conditioner bottles for a solid shampoo bar.  Reducing the amount of products you use is a big money saver.

BUY: Shampoo bar by Aquarian Bath - $7.50

4. Say no to produce bags

Let your produce go naked.  You don't need tiny plastic bags for your fruits and veggies at the grocery store.  They will be fine in your cart, I promise.

BUY: FREE!

5. Use mason jars to store and freeze food

You don't need plastic freezer bags to keep food fresh in the freezer.  Wide-mouth glass jars work just as well, if not better.  If you are freezing loose items (e.x., whole strawberries), freeze on a cookie sheet for a couple of hours first, and then pour into a jar.  If you are freezing liquid, leave a little bit of space at the top of the jar to allow the liquid to expand.  No more buying plastic baggies!

DIY: Save wide mouth jars from food items (tomato sauce, raw honey, etc.) to use in the freezer
BUY: 12 wide-mouth pint jars - $10.99

Most of these things you can DIY or find locally (except maybe the shampoo bars)--I added links for price info.

Happy Plastic Free July!

This is my FIFTH Plastic Free July!  Four years ago, in 2013, I decided to participate in my first Plastic Free July, and for the first time, really started to think about the trash I produced on a regular basis.

Whether you want to start small, or make big changes, there are plenty of ways to reduce your disposable plastic footprint this month.

Avoiding Plastic On the Go | Cellist Goes Green

On the go

I keep these in my tote bag at all times to avoid unwanted surprise plastic when I'm out and about.

Water bottle
Stay hydrated everyone!

Cloth napkin
Good for using as a napkin, or wrapping baked goods from the store. Or when someone brings food to work, and you don't want to use a plastic plate.

Metal spork
This has helped me avoid so many plastic utensils.  Get one here.

Tiny, collapsible shopping bag
I plan my shopping trips to the bulk store, but if I have to pick up broccoli or peaches quickly at the local grocery store, I keep this with me to avoid paper or plastic bags.

Stainless steel tiffin
Good for bringing homemade lunches to work, or bringing restaurant leftovers home.  Find one here.

Other ways I avoid plastic on the go:

Say no to plastic straws.
Whenever I'm eating out, I always ask for no straw.  If you really like drinking from straws, you can also bring your own glass or stainless one.

Drink my coffee or tea in the cafe.
I usually have my morning tea or coffee at home, or if I'm in a rush I will pour it into a stainless steel thermos, but sometimes I'll grab coffee or tea with my husband or friends out.  For those times, I would rather linger in the cafe with a real mug.


To read last year's Plastic Free July posts (I blogged every day!), click here: Plastic Free July 2016

This post includes affiliate links to Life Without Plastic, a company whose mission of providing ethical, plastic-free products I fully support.

Plastic Free July Day 31

Plastic Free July Day 31: Finding Community | Cellist Goes Green

I have enjoyed sharing my Plastic Free July with you this year!  I hope everyone had a successful and fun month.

For this post, I wanted to talk about finding community online (and off) in the zero waste/plastic-free community.  If you don't live in a major city, sometimes it can be hard to find other plastic-free/zero wasters nearby.

On social media, try searching the following tags:

#plasticfree
#plasticfreejuly
#zerowaste

Bea Johnson of The Zero Waste Home hosts a forum on her website, with sections covering a wide variety of topics.

Search for a local group on Meetup.com.  You can also look for groups under "Community and Environment."

Join a group on Facebook.  You could try Journey to Zero Waste or Zero Waste Heroes.

Find some awesome blogs online:

My Plastic Free Life
Zero Waste Home
The Zero Waste Chef
Paris to Go
Litterless

Treading My Own Path
The Rogue Ginger

Trash is for Tossers
Zero Waste Nerd
Going Zero Waste

 


Plastic Free July Day 30

Plastic Free July Day 30: Storing food without plastic | Cellist Goes Green

Plastic-free food storage doesn't have to be a headache.  Here are some simple ways to get the disposable plastic out of your kitchen.

This post includes affiliate links.

Replace plastic storage containers with mason jars, glass Pyrex, or other glass or stainless steel containers.

Chemicals present in plastic can leach into your food, especially when heated up, so don't feel bad about ditching the plastic takeout containers you have been hoarding.  Mason jars are a great affordable way to store food in the fridge and freezer.  I bought some glass Pyrex containers (with plastic lids) early on in my plastic-free journey that work pretty well, too.  Life Without Plastic also sells some glass storage containers that don't use any plastic in them at all--they are glass with a stainless steel lid.

You don't need plastic wrap or ziploc bags.

Ziploc bags are not the only way to prevent freezer burn, despite what the advertising tells you.  A well-sealed glass container does the job just fine.  I usually freeze food in my Pyrex containers, but if you're using a mason jar, try using a widemouth one, and leave plenty of space at the top.

I really have not missed plastic wrap or plastic storage containers once since I've made the switch--glass containers and jars have worked very well for me.  Glass or stainless is healthier for you and lasts longer (creating less waste).


If you aren't familiar with Plastic Free July, take a look at this post.  Basically, it's a month-long challenge to reduce the amount of disposable plastic you use.  It's a great starting point if you just want to give cutting out disposable plastic a try.
 
My first Plastic Free July was in 2013(!), and this month I'd like to highlight some of the things I do to reduce my plastic use, and some struggles.  Many things are part of my routine at this point (buying in bulk, refusing plastic silverware, etc.), but I am not perfect, and I always find this challenge to be a good time to refocus and look at what trash I am actually producing. 


Plastic Free July Day 29

Plastic Free July Day 29: Liquid Castile Soap in Glass | Cellist Goes Green

I use bar soap to wash my hands in the bathroom, but I still like using liquid hand soap in the kitchen.  I use liquid castile soap diluted with water in a foaming soap pump.  You may be lucky to have liquid castile soap in bulk near you, or if you use a lot of it, you could buy the largest container available to cut down on packaging.  There is one company I have found which sells castile soap in glass bottles.  You can find it here.


If you aren't familiar with Plastic Free July, take a look at this post.  Basically, it's a month-long challenge to reduce the amount of disposable plastic you use.  It's a great starting point if you just want to give cutting out disposable plastic a try.
 
My first Plastic Free July was in 2013(!), and this month I'd like to highlight some of the things I do to reduce my plastic use, and some struggles.  Many things are part of my routine at this point (buying in bulk, refusing plastic silverware, etc.), but I am not perfect, and I always find this challenge to be a good time to refocus and look at what trash I am actually producing. 


Plastic Free July Day 28

Plastic Free July Day 28: Mopping without disposable plastic | Cellist Goes Green

You don't need to get one of those spray mops with the expensive refills to keep your floors clean.  You can get a spray mop that comes with a refillable bottle and reusable pads to mop your floors.

The spray bottle stopped working on the one we purchased, so we just spray the floors with our regular spray bottle, which has a 1:1 ratio of vinegar to water, and mop over it.  It works great.  We aren't tied down to any company's refills, we can use our own cleaner (which is much healthier, and fragrance free), and it is just as easy.


If you aren't familiar with Plastic Free July, take a look at this post.  Basically, it's a month-long challenge to reduce the amount of disposable plastic you use.  It's a great starting point if you just want to give cutting out disposable plastic a try.
 
My first Plastic Free July was in 2013(!), and this month I'd like to highlight some of the things I do to reduce my plastic use, and some struggles.  Many things are part of my routine at this point (buying in bulk, refusing plastic silverware, etc.), but I am not perfect, and I always find this challenge to be a good time to refocus and look at what trash I am actually producing. 

Plastic Free July Day 27

Plastic Free July Day 27: Say no to the drycleaners | Cellist Goes Green

Step away from the dry cleaners.  Here are some ways to avoid dry cleaning's harsh cleaning agents, and all the plastic you get back with your dry cleaning.

Hand wash in cold water.

Your clothes will survive.  I just use a bar of soap, and rinse with cold water.

Wash your knits less.

Wool sweaters don't need to be washed after every use.  Wear a T-shirt or cami under sweaters to keep them clean longer.  Here's how to hand wash woolens.


If you aren't familiar with Plastic Free July, take a look at this post.  Basically, it's a month-long challenge to reduce the amount of disposable plastic you use.  It's a great starting point if you just want to give cutting out disposable plastic a try.
 
My first Plastic Free July was in 2013(!), and this month I'd like to highlight some of the things I do to reduce my plastic use, and some struggles.  Many things are part of my routine at this point (buying in bulk, refusing plastic silverware, etc.), but I am not perfect, and I always find this challenge to be a good time to refocus and look at what trash I am actually producing. 

Plastic Free July Day 26

Plastic Free July Day 26: The benefits of beeswax candles | Cellist Goes Green

Candles may not be the first thing that come to mind when you think of plastic, but most candles are now made of paraffin wax (which is made from petroleum), and the synthetic fragrances which many contain aren't so good for you.

An awesome alternative is beeswax.  Beeswax candles are not only a more natural option, they may actually purify the air.  You can buy them (I got this one on Etsy), or make your own.  When the candle has reached the end of its life, the beeswax can be composted.


If you aren't familiar with Plastic Free July, take a look at this post.  Basically, it's a month-long challenge to reduce the amount of disposable plastic you use.  It's a great starting point if you just want to give cutting out disposable plastic a try.
 
My first Plastic Free July was in 2013(!), and this month I'd like to highlight some of the things I do to reduce my plastic use, and some struggles.  Many things are part of my routine at this point (buying in bulk, refusing plastic silverware, etc.), but I am not perfect, and I always find this challenge to be a good time to refocus and look at what trash I am actually producing. 

Plastic Free July Day 25

Plastic Free July Day 25: Homemade dishwasher detergent without plastic | Cellist Goes Green

I had been using a homemade dishwasher detergent that called for citric acid as one of the main ingredients.  Which I didn't love because citric acid only comes in a plastic bag.  (And also because the detergent made my glasses spotty, and my silverware dull).  So I have been on the hunt for another recipe.

This one works much better, and with only 3 ingredients (+water): lemons, salt and vinegar.  You can check out the recipe here.  No more plastic bags of citric acid, hooray!


If you aren't familiar with Plastic Free July, take a look at this post.  Basically, it's a month-long challenge to reduce the amount of disposable plastic you use.  It's a great starting point if you just want to give cutting out disposable plastic a try.
 
My first Plastic Free July was in 2013(!), and this month I'd like to highlight some of the things I do to reduce my plastic use, and some struggles.  Many things are part of my routine at this point (buying in bulk, refusing plastic silverware, etc.), but I am not perfect, and I always find this challenge to be a good time to refocus and look at what trash I am actually producing. 

Plastic Free July Day 24

Plastic Free July Day 24: Plastic-free makeup options

For everyday makeup, I use two things: a light foundation/concealer (RMS beauty Un-Coverup) and a solid mascara from T.W.I.N.K. beauty on Etsy.  Neither has any plastic packaging, and both use safe ingredients.  RMS has other products, if you are looking for eye or lip color, or you could try your hand at homemade cosmetics.

(If you haven't seen solid mascara before, you wet the brush and rub it over the mascara to get the color on the brush).


If you aren't familiar with Plastic Free July, take a look at this post.  Basically, it's a month-long challenge to reduce the amount of disposable plastic you use.  It's a great starting point if you just want to give cutting out disposable plastic a try.
 
My first Plastic Free July was in 2013(!), and this month I'd like to highlight some of the things I do to reduce my plastic use, and some struggles.  Many things are part of my routine at this point (buying in bulk, refusing plastic silverware, etc.), but I am not perfect, and I always find this challenge to be a good time to refocus and look at what trash I am actually producing. 

Plastic Free July Day 23

Plastic Free July Day 23: Paper-wrapped toilet paper | Cellist Goes Green

Sorry this post is a day late!  My husband and I had a fun day over the weekend seeing some friends and going to a couple of great museums :)  (Sadly, this weekend also came with a plastic straw, even though I asked for none in my drink). 

So you will get two posts today!

This is a pretty no-brainer change: find toilet paper wrapped in paper.  I buy Seventh Generation, because the toilet paper has a minimum 50-percent post-consumer recycled paper content.  It doesn't make sense to be using forests of trees for something like this!

I get mine locally, but if you would rather, Amazon does carry a 60-roll box that supposedly ships plastic free (look at the Q&A on the product page). 


If you aren't familiar with Plastic Free July, take a look at this post.  Basically, it's a month-long challenge to reduce the amount of disposable plastic you use.  It's a great starting point if you just want to give cutting out disposable plastic a try.
 
My first Plastic Free July was in 2013(!), and this month I'd like to highlight some of the things I do to reduce my plastic use, and some struggles.  Many things are part of my routine at this point (buying in bulk, refusing plastic silverware, etc.), but I am not perfect, and I always find this challenge to be a good time to refocus and look at what trash I am actually producing. 


Plastic Free July Day 22

Plastic Free July Day 22: Use handkerchiefs! | Cellist Goes Green

We have been using hankies in place of tissues since my first Plastic Free July.  Tissue boxes generally all have some plastic wrapping, whether it be around the whole box or inside the top. 

By using reusable handkerchiefs instead, you are not only preventing plastic waste, you are preventing lots of paper waste.  My husband went through so many tissues before we made the switch, I used to joke he killed a forest of trees in tissues.  And handkerchiefs are so much easier on your nose, they really do a better job than tissues.

We got our hankies here, and we keep them in a little basket I found at Goodwill.


If you aren't familiar with Plastic Free July, take a look at this post.  Basically, it's a month-long challenge to reduce the amount of disposable plastic you use.  It's a great starting point if you just want to give cutting out disposable plastic a try.
 
My first Plastic Free July was in 2013(!), and this month I'd like to highlight some of the things I do to reduce my plastic use, and some struggles.  Many things are part of my routine at this point (buying in bulk, refusing plastic silverware, etc.), but I am not perfect, and I always find this challenge to be a good time to refocus and look at what trash I am actually producing. 


Plastic Free July Day 21

Plastic Free July Day 21  | Cellist Goes Green

Our area doesn't have all of the bulk/local options I would like.  We have no bulk olive oil or vinegar options.  Which is frustrating, because I know there are places where I could reduce my packaging use (both plastic and not), but those options are simply not available where I live.

I have contacted the bulk stores near me, expressing interest in bulk olive oil and vinegar, in hopes maybe someday they will decide to carry them.  On suggestion from an Instagram comment, I have also reached out to a couple of raw honey producers I get honey from to see if they would take my jar back for reuse, but was told they wouldn't do that for local health code reasons.

I will keep trying.  I think it is important to show businesses and small producers there is an interest in bulk products.  If enough people ask for food with less packaging, eventually change will happen.


If you aren't familiar with Plastic Free July, take a look at this post.  Basically, it's a month-long challenge to reduce the amount of disposable plastic you use.  It's a great starting point if you just want to give cutting out disposable plastic a try.
 
My first Plastic Free July was in 2013(!), and this month I'd like to highlight some of the things I do to reduce my plastic use, and some struggles.  Many things are part of my routine at this point (buying in bulk, refusing plastic silverware, etc.), but I am not perfect, and I always find this challenge to be a good time to refocus and look at what trash I am actually producing. 


Plastic Free July Day 20

Plastic Free July Day 20: Make your own yogurt | Cellist Goes Green

Making your own yogurt is another simple switch you can make.  We get our milk in returnable glass bottles, so making our own yogurt cuts down on a lot of packaging.  And yogurt is really good for you--it's a fermented food, and incorporating fermented foods into your diet has tons of benefits for your digestive health.  If you are curious about fermenting, I would check out Michael Pollan's book Cooked (which has a whole section on fermentation), and look at the Zero Waste Chef's blog.

Anyway, you do not need a yogurt maker to make your own yogurt--you can just as easily make it on the stove in a pan, and there is very little hands on time.  I follow Martha Stewart's instructions (there are only 4 simple steps!).


If you aren't familiar with Plastic Free July, take a look at this post.  Basically, it's a month-long challenge to reduce the amount of disposable plastic you use.  It's a great starting point if you just want to give cutting out disposable plastic a try.
 
My first Plastic Free July was in 2013(!), and this month I'd like to highlight some of the things I do to reduce my plastic use, and some struggles.  Many things are part of my routine at this point (buying in bulk, refusing plastic silverware, etc.), but I am not perfect, and I always find this challenge to be a good time to refocus and look at what trash I am actually producing. 


Plastic Free July Day 19

 
Plastic Free July Day 19: Make your own beans and avoid plastic-lined cans | Cellist Goes Green
 

Plastic can hide in sneaky places.  For example, aluminum cans are lined with plastic in order to keep the metal from reacting to the food inside. 

While some manufacturers have removed BPA from their packaging, many have not.  The EWG has created a database of packaged foods which contain BPA in their packaging.  And even if a company doesn't use BPA, the can is still lined with plastic and may use other materials which are also problematic.

One easy way to avoid canned food is to cook your own dried beans.  It's super simple, and requires virtually no hands on time.

How to cook dried beans

  1. Cover dried beans with water, and soak overnight.  Make sure you've covered them with plenty of water, they will soak up a lot!
  2. Drain the beans, and put in a pot, covering them with fresh water.
  3. Cook in boiling water for 45 minutes to two hours, depending on the kind of bean.  You should check periodically with a fork to see if they're done.

That's it!  It's one of the simplest food switches you can make.  You can also make them in the crockpot if that's your thing.

Most stores that carry bulk foods have at least a few varieties of dried beans.  We use a lot of chickpeas, black beans and navy beans.


If you aren't familiar with Plastic Free July, take a look at this post.  Basically, it's a month-long challenge to reduce the amount of disposable plastic you use.  It's a great starting point if you just want to give cutting out disposable plastic a try.
 
My first Plastic Free July was in 2013(!), and this month I'd like to highlight some of the things I do to reduce my plastic use, and some struggles.  Many things are part of my routine at this point (buying in bulk, refusing plastic silverware, etc.), but I am not perfect, and I always find this challenge to be a good time to refocus and look at what trash I am actually producing. 


Plastic Free July Day 18

Plastic Free July Day 18: Why using your own water bottle is super important | Cellist Goes Green

It's summer (in the Northern hemisphere :), and that means staying hydrated is super important.  One of the best things you can do to reduce the disposable plastic waste you produce is to bring your own water bottle.  If you use your own reusable water bottle instead of a disposable bottle of water every day for a year, that is 365 bottles which are prevented from entering the waste stream, and possibly getting into our waterways!

Use a reusable bottle made of glass or stainless steel.  We use glass ones from Life Factory, and Klean Kanteen makes stainless steel ones without any plastic parts at all, but a glass mason jar works just as well!

Many bottled water brands are actually just filtered tap water (and bottled water has less regulations than the tap water in your home).  And chemicals from the plastic bottle itself can actually leach into the water.  More info both issues here

You can install a home water filter if you want more peace of mind about your tap water.

Another environmental issue (besides the plastic pollution of the bottles themselves) is where some bottled water companies get the water itself.  Last year (in 2015), Nestle extracted 36 million gallons of water from a national forest in California, during the height of that state's historic drought.

So, make the switch to a reusable water bottle!  Keep your water bottle or jar by your keys so you remember when you leave the house. 💦


If you aren't familiar with Plastic Free July, take a look at this post.  Basically, it's a month-long challenge to reduce the amount of disposable plastic you use.  It's a great starting point if you just want to give cutting out disposable plastic a try.
 
My first Plastic Free July was in 2013(!), and this month I'd like to highlight some of the things I do to reduce my plastic use, and some struggles.  Many things are part of my routine at this point (buying in bulk, refusing plastic silverware, etc.), but I am not perfect, and I always find this challenge to be a good time to refocus and look at what trash I am actually producing. 


This post includes affiliate links.

Plastic Free July Day 17

Plastic Free July Day 17: Easy laundry switches | Cellist Goes Green

Laundry is another easy plastic-free switch. 

For laundry detergent you can:

Use soap nuts !  Soap nuts are actually berries that produce natural saponins (which act as a surfactant, to break the surface tension of the water and clean your clothes).  We buy from EcoNuts, and they package the soap nuts in a cardboard box.  If you are super lucky, maybe a bulk store near you carries them.

If you've never used them before, it's really easy.  They come with a little cloth bag, and you stick 4-5 soap nuts inside and throw it in with your wash.  They can be used up to ten times, and it actually costs a lot less than regular detergent.  When the soap nuts are used up, you can throw them in the compost.

Some people also make their own laundry detergent.  You can grate up a bar of soap (I use this soap for washing my dishes, and it can be also used in laundry detergent), and mix it up with some baking soda and washing soda.  If you look on Pinterest, there are a ton of different recipes.

Instead of fabric softener:

Use wool dryer balls.  Dryer balls cut down on the static and the drying time.  You can put a couple of drops of essential oil on them if you miss the scent of dryer sheets, and you'll avoid the synthetic fragrance.

If you need your clothes super soft, you can also put a cup or two of vinegar in the washing machine. 

Instead of bleach:

Use the juice of one or two lemons in with your whites, and wash on hot!


If you aren't familiar with Plastic Free July, take a look at this post.  Basically, it's a month-long challenge to reduce the amount of disposable plastic you use.  It's a great starting point if you just want to give cutting out disposable plastic a try.
 
My first Plastic Free July was in 2013(!), and this month I'd like to highlight some of the things I do to reduce my plastic use, and some struggles.  Many things are part of my routine at this point (buying in bulk, refusing plastic silverware, etc.), but I am not perfect, and I always find this challenge to be a good time to refocus and look at what trash I am actually producing. 


Plastic Free July Day 16

Plastic Free July 16: Get rid of those paper towels! | Cellist Goes Green

Paper towels are one of those products like paper napkins that really only come wrapped in plastic (at least in the U.S. where I live!).  I initially stopped buying paper towels because of the plastic wrap, but I soon realized throwing away endless paper towels to wipe up kitchen spills was pretty wasteful, and not a good use of resources.

Now I use reusable dishcloths instead.

Benefits of using reusable dishcloths:

  • They work better to wipe up spills
  • They save you money
  • You don't have to keep going to the store to buy disposable products

I bought some dishcloths at a store, but my sister also knitted me a few!  You can find the pattern she used here.


If you aren't familiar with Plastic Free July, take a look at this post.  Basically, it's a month-long challenge to reduce the amount of disposable plastic you use.  It's a great starting point if you just want to give cutting out disposable plastic a try.
 
My first Plastic Free July was in 2013(!), and this month I'd like to highlight some of the things I do to reduce my plastic use, and some struggles.  Many things are part of my routine at this point (buying in bulk, refusing plastic silverware, etc.), but I am not perfect, and I always find this challenge to be a good time to refocus and look at what trash I am actually producing. 

Plastic Free July Day 15

Plastic Free July Day 15: Using cloth napkins | Cellist Goes Green

Making the switch to cloth napkins is pretty easy.  I don't find that it makes any more laundry, I just throw them in with another load when they are dirty. 

Benefits of cloth napkins:

  • Make everything look fancier
  • No plastic packaging
  • Not using trees for a product that will be used once and thrown out
  • Can be used over and over
  • Frugal--you don't need to keep buying packages of paper napkins

You can use cloth napkins at home and in your lunchbox at work or school.  I usually stick one in a reusable bag when I'm on the go.


If you aren't familiar with Plastic Free July, take a look at this post.  Basically, it's a month-long challenge to reduce the amount of disposable plastic you use.  It's a great starting point if you just want to give cutting out disposable plastic a try.
 
My first Plastic Free July was in 2013(!), and this month I'd like to highlight some of the things I do to reduce my plastic use, and some struggles.  Many things are part of my routine at this point (buying in bulk, refusing plastic silverware, etc.), but I am not perfect, and I always find this challenge to be a good time to refocus and look at what trash I am actually producing. 


Plastic Free July Day 14

Plastic Free July Day 14: Get milk in returnable glass bottles | Cellist Goes Green

We are lucky that we can get milk in returnable glass bottles.  If you drink milk, check your local natural foods store or Whole Foods to see if they carry it.  Some places even still have milk delivery (not by us, sadly :( ). 

Getting returnable glass bottles is great because:

  • Plastic is not coming in contact with your food
  • You are not throwing away a plastic container
  • More resources aren't being used to recycle the glass container

If you are not a cow's milk person, or you can't find glass bottled milk near you and are willing to try something different, you can try making your own nut milk.  Litterless has simple instructions here.
 



If you aren't familiar with Plastic Free July, take a look at this post.  Basically, it's a month-long challenge to reduce the amount of disposable plastic you use.  It's a great starting point if you just want to give cutting out disposable plastic a try.
 
My first Plastic Free July was in 2013(!), and this month I'd like to highlight some of the things I do to reduce my plastic use, and some struggles.  Many things are part of my routine at this point (buying in bulk, refusing plastic silverware, etc.), but I am not perfect, and I always find this challenge to be a good time to refocus and look at what trash I am actually producing.